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A Genome-sized Media Failure

genelogic:

I offer some final thoughts on the media coverage of ENCODE over at the Huffington Post. A teaser:

[The ENCODE publication] was a fantastic opportunity for scientists and science journalists to explain to the public some of the exciting and important research findings in genome biology that are changing how we think about health, disease, and our evolutionary past. But we blew it, in a big way…

Influenced by misleading press releases and statements by scientists, story after story suggested that debunking junk DNA was the main result of the ENCODE studies. These stories failed us all in three major ways: they distorted the science done before ENCODE, they obscured the real significance of the ENCODE project, and most crucially, they mislead the public on how science really works.

Source: genelogic
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genelogic:

I like Ed Yong’s reportage, but this makes me sad:

Scientists have long recognised that some non-coding DNA probably has a function, and many solid examples have recently come to light


1) It’s not “probably.” Some non-coding DNA is functional. Period. Genes have promoters and enhancers.

2) Promoters and enhancers have not “recently come to light.” They were discovered long before we sequenced any genomes.

Source: genelogic
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genelogic:

Not happy with the hype:

It is oddly fitting that the papers describing the results of the NIH’s massive $200m ENCODE project were published in the midst of political convention season. For this was no typical scientific publication, but a carefully orchestrated spectacle, meant to justify a massive, expensive undertaking, and to convince us that we are better off now than we were five years ago.

Source: genelogic
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gene logic: Reproducibility failure makes bioinformatics anecdotal

genelogic:

From I blog I need to follow, Living in an Ivory Basement: (h/t John Hawks)

All too often, biologists and bioinformaticians spend time hunting for the magic combination of parameters that gives them a good result, where “good result” is defined as “a result that matches expectations, but…

Source: genelogic
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frogandbell:

“Feathers” - xkcd.com by Randall Munroe

(via entropicsyncretism)

Source: xkcd.com
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physilology:

Citrus Mitosis Silk Scarf by Michele Banks (artologica on etsy)

Glamorous and geeky at the same time, this gorgeous silk scarf is printed with a design from “Citrus Mitosis 2”, (image 5) one of my original watercolor paintings of dividing cells. In fresh, soft colors of yellow, orange and green, it’s perfect for biologists, doctors, science teachers or for any chic geek.

(via entropicsyncretism)

Source: physilology
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Craft Time!

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How science climbs out of the chaotic morass and into paradigms and puzzles

genelogic:

Grab a drink and come on over to The Finch and Pea to talk about Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

Source: genelogic
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